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Tuesday, May 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Excavations at the Roman fort at Brough, E. Yorkshire found in the catalog.

Excavations at the Roman fort at Brough, E. Yorkshire

Philip Corder

Excavations at the Roman fort at Brough, E. Yorkshire

by Philip Corder

  • 60 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Published by Hull University College Local History Committee, by arrangement with the East Riding Antiquarian Society in Hull .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Excavations (Archaeology) -- England -- Yorkshire.,
  • Fortification, Roman -- England -- Yorkshire.,
  • Great Britain -- Antiquities, Roman.

  • Edition Notes

    Cover title.

    Statementby Philip Corder.
    ContributionsUniversity College of Hull. Local history committee., East Riding Antiquarian Society.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination37 p., [1] leaf of plates :
    Number of Pages37
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16338039M

    History of Brough Castle. Brough Castle, at the upper end of the Eden Valley, is a spectacular medieval ruin on the site of the Roman fort of Verteris. The earthworks represent an 11th-century castle, but the visible remains date from the 12th century onwards. The site of a Roman fort at Brough Hill, Bainbridge. Earthwork remains are visible of the Roman fort and fort annexe. The fort was probably Flavian, and the annexe, possibly containing a bath house, Severan in date. The fort was first excavated by Kirk and Collingwood in , then by Droop for Liverpool University in and

    Greene, D. (); The Roman Roads in South Yorkshire; Yorkshire Archaeological Journal Vol 38 Part ; Yorkshire Archaeological Society, Leeds, pp. - Greene, D. (); The Roman Roads in the Don Valley: The Roman Fort, Templebrough - The Western Approach. Transactions of the Hunter Archaeological Society. Vol 7: pp. Philip Corder, Excavations at the Roman fort at Brough-on-Humber, Hull ; and Sir George Macdonald, The Roman Wall in Scotland, 2nd ed. Oxford PSAN ser. 4, vi pt. 6, ,

    Mamucium, also known as Mancunium, is a former Roman fort in the Castlefield area of Manchester in North West castra, which was founded c. AD 79 within the Roman province of Britannia, was garrisoned by a cohort of Roman Auxiliaries near two major Roman roads running through the area. Several sizeable civilian settlements (or vicus) containing soldiers' families, merchants and Architectural style: Roman fort. The Roman Cemetery at Brougham, Cumbria: Excavations (Britannia Monographs) Excavations to the east of the fort and vicus of Brougham, in and , the results of which have only recently been evaluated, uncovered a cemetery that was in use during the 3rd century. A population of all ages were buried in the cemetery, cremated Cited by:


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Excavations at the Roman fort at Brough, E. Yorkshire by Philip Corder Download PDF EPUB FB2

Excavations at Welton Road are the first outside the walled settlement at Brough-on-Humber to be published, enabling archaeologists to assess the nature of suburban occupation at Brough, and allowing some conclusions to be drawn about the status of the Roman town.

The north Yorkshire town of Hawes lies 3 miles to the west on the A and Aysgarth in the opposite direction is 6 miles, in what is a very beautiful part of The Yorkshire Dales National Park. The fort of Brough-by-Bainbridge lies on a low, round-shaped hill and measures roughly 99 metres by 80 metres ( by feet), an area of hectares.

The Roman Fort at Bainbridge, Wensleydale: Excavations by B.R. Hartley on the Principia and a Summary Account of Other Excavations and Surveys - Volume 43 - Paul BidwellCited by: 4.

The monument includes the earthwork and buried remains of Brough Roman fort and its associated vicus or civil settlement and the upstanding and buried remains of Brough Castle.

The fort and castle are located to the west of the village of Church Brough on the highest part of a ridge to the south of Swindale Beck. Bibliography. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z.

Allason-Jones, L. and Miket, R. The Catalogue of Small Finds from South Shields Roman Fort. Excavations at Brough-on-Humber –61 Download book PDF Viewer book. Wacher, J.S. Subjects:Humanities, Fifth Report on the Excavations of the Roman Fort at Richborough, Kent Download book PDF Viewer book.

Cunliffe, B.W. The Romans in Yorkshire A Concise History. by Ingrid Barton. Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 BC but the Romans did nothing more until 43 AD when the Emperor Claudius, ostensibly at the request of a British king, landed near what is now Colchester and began a conquest of the land.

Excavations at Brough-on-Humber –61 Download book PDF Viewer book. Wacher, J.S. Subjects:Humanities, First Report on the Excavations of the Roman Fort at Richborough, Kent Download book PDF Viewer book.

Bushe-Fox, J.P. Books and journals Camden, W, Britannia, () RCHME, Bainbridge Roman Fort, () RCHME, Bainbridge Roman Fort, () Collingwood, R G, 'Proceedings of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society' in Excavations at Brough-By-Bainbridge inVol.

1, (), Droop, J P, Jones, C W, 'Proceedings of the Leeds Philosophical. The site of a Roman Town. Excavations have uncovered evidence for a possible Roman temporary camp, a fort and possible later naval base; allegedly a civitas capital.

There is evidence for native settlement on the site prior to the Romans. The Roman place name is Petuaria. Excavations within the Roman Fort, –86, London Garbsch, J. Mann und Roβ und Wagen, Munich Greene, K.

‘The fortress coarseware’, in Manning3 – Cited by: 4. Brief Accounts of Each Roman road in Yorkshire. The map below is interactive - simply click on any road to bring up a brief summary. Alternatively, below the map is a list of all the known, probably and claimed roads in Yorkshire - each road name is clickable and will.

Petuaria (or Petuaria Parisorum) was originally a Roman fort situated where the town of Brough in the East Riding of Yorkshire now stands. Petuaria means something like 'quarter' or 'fourth part', incorporating the archaic Brythonic *petuar, 'four' (compare modern Welsh pedwar).

It was founded in 70 AD and abandoned in about Excavations in Derbyshire have uncovered the remains of a Roman settlement near the fort at Brough. The area is known to have a rich industrial and mining heritage, dating back to at least the Roman period, and it was hoped that the project would shed more light on Roman.

Excavations at the Roman town at Brough, E. Yorkshire, Author Bainbridge Roman fort and annexe is a Scheduled Monument in Bainbridge, North Yorkshire, England.

See why it was listed, view it on a map, see visitor comments and photos and share your own comments and photos of this building. Get this from a library. Excavations at Brough-on-Humber, [J S Wacher].

South Shields Roman Fort Bibliography This is divided into two sections: 1. The short version: books and articles relevant for the most recent research on the site, plus some useful back-ground works 2. A full and detailed bibliography on the excavations and finds at Arbeia Roman Fort.

Recent Roman discoveries during the A1 upgrade in north Yorkshire. InHighways England opened an upgraded section of motorway on the A1 in North Yorkshire. Construction of the new road prompted a series of large-scale excavations, with illuminating results.

Stuart Ross and Cath Ross present some of the preliminary findings. Brough’s medieval castle stands within the remains of a # Roman fort, # Verterae, and the # BroughStone probably came from the cemetery of the fort.

It is a tall, rather narrow rectangle, cut from the local brownish sandstone. The inscription is framed on either side by stylized palm branches and above by two squares, each neatly divided into eight triangles, suggestive of a gaming board.5/5.

ROMAN BROUGH. Ever since the antiquary William Camden identified the site as Roman Verteris in the 16th century, local antiquaries have been aware of Brough’s ancient past, and Roman finds have been casually picked up there. In Henry Ecroyd-Smith wrote a paper on the site, characterising it as ‘a neglected Roman station’.

He described the remarkable range of finds, emphasising the.The Annexe of the Roman Fort at Slack, West Yorkshire: Excavations by B.R. Hartley in –9 Article in Britannia May with 20 Reads How we measure 'reads'.Navio Roman Fort at Brough, Near Hope and Castleton.

If you are the least bit interested in the Romans, then make a stop at the village of Brough, just North of Bradwell. On the face of it, there is not much to see, but with a little imagination a fascinating chunk .